Introduction to solids: Baby-led weaning

Baby-led weaning (BLW) is becoming a very popular way to feed solids to your baby. It offers an alternative method to the traditional introduction to complementary foods in your baby’s diet. With this method, infants use their hands to explore food and to feed themselves, instead of being spoon-fed purees or baby food.

If you and your pediatrician decide this is the method you’d like to try, your baby can begin once he is six months old, sit upright, and can bring objects to his mouth. Once your baby is ready, place graspable stick-shaped family foods (food you eat at home without added salt or sugar) in the tray of his high chair and let him pick it up and put it in his mouth freely. As a parent, you decide what to offer to eat but the baby will decide what to eat (which should also be true for traditional spoon feeding). Always remember that food should not be forced and milk remains an essential part of your baby’s diet.

In theory, with BLW you expose your baby to a wide variety of healthy foods, teach him to eat food that the family enjoys and allow him to control his own intake. No grams or teaspoons are counted when preparing your baby’s food, nor is it necessary for your baby to finish it all. Eating should be a pleasurable experience. Continue reading

Playdates 101

If you are thinking of organizing play dates…Congrats! That means you have mastered the diaper changing and feeding, and, hopefully, you’re getting some sleep and even managed to start showering every day.

So probably now you have a bunch of questions about play dates, is my baby ready for play dates? How long should it last? What are some do’s and don’ts I should know? Don’t worry, we will give you some tips and try to clear the air around all of your questions.

You can start right now!

If you have an infant, playdates ten to be more about you, the mommies. It is important you find mommies that you can relate to so that you can talk about the daily routine, breastfeeding or bottle-feeding and even funny or not-so-funny stories. Don’t worry, they will totally understand as they are on the same page as you. During these playdates babies will be able to profit from being exposed to new toys, an unfamiliar environment, and even another small person lying next to them, even if they sleep most of the time. Continue reading

How to Cure Your Baby’s Hiccups

Everyone is familiar with hiccups. We have all experienced them from time to time. However, most first-time parents tend to worry when their newborns get hiccups. And they shouldn’t – hiccups are quite common in babies under one year old.

As a matter of fact, most parents may not know this, but their little one has probably been having hiccups since he was in the womb! Most likely starting around the 6th month of the pregnancy, when their little lungs were developing.

What causes hiccups in newborns?

Hiccups are usually caused by a full stomach, taking in too much air while feeding, or a sudden change in temperature. It’s important to note that they don’t typically bother the baby.

What should you do if your newborn gets the hiccups?

First, don’t worry and try to relax. It’s not dangerous to your baby. You could try burping her, but chances are you’ll just have to wait it out.
Check out the following 3 tips you can try at home:

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Why should you hold on to some parenting practices?

Change is in our nature! We live in a world that is constantly changing, where we have learned to adapt to new situations and environments. As we discover and experience new things, our parenting practices and cultural beliefs change with us.

Experience has taught us that some old-fashioned social or parenting practices are not good for us, so we strive to change them entirely. But, what about questions we haven’t been able to answer yet? Or wrong knowledge that we thought it was right? New research found that some past parenting practices and cultural beliefs were actually pretty good, and should not be abandoned, since they are necessary for a healthy brain development.

Human babies are born with needs, as their brains haven’t fully developed yet. Narvaez says that ancestral early parenting involved breast-feeding, responsivity, touch, play, and natural childbirth. Studies have found that all of these nurturing practices have a positive impact on a child’s developing brain. For instance, breastfeeding provides nutrients and helps create bonding between mother and baby. Play is an essential form of learning and expressing in children that helps babies develop both social skills and self-control. And touch as a form of language affects empathy and self-control. The problem is that we have abandoned some of these parenting practices, since our cultural or contemporary beliefs have changed, and so, our behavior towards children has changed, too.

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