All posts by Alice

Big kids’ bed: Tips for a smooth transition

If your little one has found a way to escape from the crib even when the mattress is in the lowest position possible, it is a good time to move from the crib to a bed.

Falling down and getting hurt is a risk that can occur once toddlers learn the tricks that allow them to climb down from the crib. Now, the good news is that most children are happy to make the change to a “big kid” bed. Perhaps your little one will even agree with you that he should stay in bed all night. Nevertheless, this transition involves a big change, so reinforcing bedtime rules and routines becomes a crucial step in avoiding those dreaded nighttime visits.

Reinforcing the bedtime routine

  • First of all, make sure your child is not sick, does not need to use the toilet (if he is potty trained) and that you are not going through a major transition such as welcoming a new baby.
  • If you don’t have a bed just yet, don’t worry. For now, you can temporarily place the crib’s mattress on the floor.
  • Celebrate this new milestone together and praise him for growing up. If you make a big deal about this new change, the transition will be more attractive to him.
  • Continue following the same bedtime routine as always ​​but do not forget to add this last step: tell your child that he should stay in bed until you come for him in the morning.
  • Once your toddler is lying down in his bed and you have completed the routine, praise him for following the instructions, give him a big kiss a hug and gently leave the room.
  • Don’t forget to tell your little one you’ll look out for him at night. This will give him a sense of tranquility and safety.
  • Finally, if your toddler wakes up and leaves his bed, make sure to take him right back to his bed quickly and in the most boring way possible. The first night might pose many unsolicited visits but if you remain firm and consistent in taking him back to his room, your little one will learn to stay in bed at night.

Preventing bedtime battles

We are not going to lie, at first you’ll probably need to repeat the phrase “you can not get out of bed until morning” until you feel like a broken record. Try to remain calm, this is perfectly normal, your baby is simply enjoying his newfound freedom. Now, if you want your baby stay in your bed all night, try to ignore his protests, stand firm and strengthen the bedtime routine with positive praise when he sleeps in his bed all night. Remind him that the rules include all family members to sleep in their own bed until morning (with the exception of getting up to go to the bathroom). Finally prevent letting your toddler sleep in your bed or stay with the family past his bedtime if you do not want this to become a habit.

Tips for a successful transition

  • Place a night light in your little one’s room.
  • Incite your toddler to take one of his stuffed animals to bed with him if he does not do this yet.
  • Invite him to choose his sheets, duvet and even his bed!
  • Use a chart of achievements where you can place a sticker every time your little one stays all night in bed.
  • If you can, get a clock that changes color when you can get up.

Keeping my baby safe

Now that your bedroom is easier to access, verify that there are no toys on the floor or placed where they pose a hazard. If you live in a two-story house, ensure access to the stairs is blocked. Finally, try not to buy bunk beds since studies have reported that they cause accidents and head injuries.

Hopefully this information helps you on this important transition. Remember that the process can be tiring and difficult, but we know you can achieve it! Always follow your instincts and do what’s best for you, your baby, and your family; only you will know what is best.

Sweet dreams!


 

For more information make sure you read:

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/toddler/Pages/Big-Kid-Beds-When-To-Make-the-Switch.aspx

Your Child’s Health by: Barton D. Schmitt

Breastfeeding 101

Breast milk is a great gift from nature and a universal aspect of motherhood. Not only does it provide adequate and personalized nutrition for your little one, but it’s also a great way to form emotional bonds. It has so many benefits that the American Academy of Pediatrics, World Health Organization, United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund and many other organizations consistently recommended breastfeeding as the best choice for feeding infants, at least during their first 6 months of life.

Giving your baby breast milk involves learning a new skill; and that requires patience and practice. You might even need to wait a few days before milk production is established. So don’t worry if your milk does not come out at first, once your ‘let down reflex’ kicks in your supply will increase.

What should I do to start?

Begin by taking in a deep breath and get your body as relaxed and comfortable possible. Try to let things emerge spontaneously, as that promotes relaxation and helps your baby feel calm too. Choose whichever position you desire to breastfeed. You can be sitting in a comfortable chair or lying down, as long as you and your baby are comfortable. Continue reading

Motor Milestones: Learning to sit independently

Watching your baby begin to develop independence can be exhilarating. Your baby enjoys this process too since he is able to explore with a different perspective the world that surrounds him.

One way your baby begins to gain independence is learning to sit on his own, but this does not happen overnight. First, a series of steps and motor skills are required for him to master this milestone.

Being able to sit upright means your baby’s neck and back muscles are strong enough to carry their weight in an upright position and he has gained control of his head.

According to Pediatrician Melissa Goldstein M.D. a baby’s development starts from the head down. At 4 months old babies are able to sit down with support from a caretaker or furniture. By 5-6 months old most can sit by themselves in a tripod position in which they position their hands on the floor in front of themselves for reinforcement. At 7 months old they will probably sit on their own for some seconds with no support and free hands to explore and grab objects around themselves. At this point they might even be able to sit up from lying down on their tummy by pushing themselves up from the surface with their hands. Finally, by the age of 8 or 9 months they are likely to sit steadily on their own for some time. Continue reading