Quality interactions enhance language development

You’ve probably been told that the best way to stimulate your little one’s language development is by talking to her all the time. And that advice is sort of true. Research has shown that kids who hear more words from their caregivers have better language skills and academic performance. But a more recent study found that it’s the way you interact with your child that makes the difference.

The study, led by Dr. Kathy Kirsh-Pasek of Temple University, looked at 60 low-income families and how the parents interacted with their children when they played or read a book. Researchers watched recordings of 60 mothers playing with their two-year-olds and they counted how many words the little ones heard during the interaction. They then compared those interactions to the children’s language skills when they turned three. They found that the quality of interactions between parents and children mattered more than the number of words they heard. The children with better language skills had interactions that involved:
• Joint attention. When a child and parent pay attention and communicate about the same thing, they share joint attention. This engagement helps children learn new words because the adult provides the words for the actions and objects they are engrossed with. For example, if you’re playing with a doll and your daughter points to a bottle, then you can say “Do you think she’s hungry? Let’s give her the bottle.” And proceed to feed the doll.
• Repetitiveness. Children love repetition. They thrive on routines because they know what to expect, what’s coming next. Everyday routines help them learn new words as well because the repetitiveness makes it easier for them to learn and remember them. You can incorporate routines into your playtime or have one for bath and bedtime too.
• Connectedness. When parents connect with their children during interactions, they take turns, listen and participate equally. This motivates children to interact for longer periods of time and therefore gives them a better chance of learning.

Talking a lot to your daughter and repeating a lot of words over and over isn’t enough. It’s the interaction that counts –quality interactions. Connect with her and tune into what she is doing and trying to communicate. That will go a long way towards her language development.

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