All posts by Ana Sofia

Three must-read books for parents!

On previous blog posts we’ve talked about great books for your little ones and now we think it’s time to recommend books for you, Mom and Dad!

It’s always good to stay informed, to understand your child’s development and find out ways to enhance it through good reads. Finding the right book is tough, though! After all, if the information it relays will impact your parenting style, it’s best to make sure it’s backed by accurate scientific research.

 

Here are three great books that we highly recommend:

  1. Brain Rules for Baby: How to Raise a Smart and Happy Child from Zero to Five by Dr. John Medina

brainrules

 

In his book, Dr. John Medina explains what the latest scientific research says about how to raise smart and happy children. Written in a light and friendly way, Brain Rules for Baby connects what researchers know about children’s developing brains and what parents practice every day. A must-read!

 

 

 

  1. How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character by Paul Tough

Howchildrensucceed

 

In this New York Times Bestseller, journalist Paul Tough discusses the importance of ‘non-cognitive skills’, also known as character, in creating successful outcomes for kids. He explores the available research on how parents affect their children, how human skills develop, and how character is formed. Who succeeds and who fails? Why do some children thrive and others lose their way? What can we do to steer a child – or a generation of children – towards success?

 

 

  1. Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs by Ellen Galinsky

MindintheMaking

 

How can we help children flourish in life and as life-long learners? Scholar Ellen Galinsky has spent her career researching the “essential life skills” children need to reach their full potential. These skills are: focus and self-control, perspective taking, communicating, making connections, critical thinking, taking on challenges, and self-directed, engaged learning. In her book, Galinsky describes strategies to develop these skills at home and in the classroom.

 


 

These books are part of our must-read list. How about yours? Do you have any recommendations of your own? Please share them below!

Choosing the right books for your little one!

Taking a couple of minutes a day to read with your baby will dramatically increase his or her language skills. Not only that, but reading time is a great bonding activity that will strengthen the emotional ties between you and your little one. Plus, adding reading to your daily routine will increase the odds of your child enjoying reading and becoming a reader herself.

It’s important to find the right book, keeping in mind that it fits your child’s interests, maturity, and reading level. Here are some basic things to look out for.

Infants and toddlers (birth – age 2)

  • Look for books with big and colorful pictures of familiar objects.
  • They should be written in short, simple sentences and may include rhymes that are fun to read aloud and easy for your little one to eventually imitate.
  • Go for thick cardboard, plastic or cloth books. These are usually perfect for small children to handle and experiment with (and they’ll survive it because they can easily be wiped clean).
  • Think tactile – stimulate your child’s senses with books with different textures or scents.
  • Find stories about everyday life and events like bedtime, baths, or mealtime, especially if they’re illustrated with photos of children who are your child’s age or a bit older.
  • Stories that review basic concepts like colors, shapes, letters and numbers are always good to have around.
  • Finally, think about your child’s passions and look for books about them! What plot line will he or she enjoy the most?

Continue reading

The best way to read with your 1-year-old

In previous blog postswe have highlighted the importance of making a habit out of reading to your baby every day, bringing special one-on-one quality time that strengthens your bond. Depending on your baby’s age, you can focus on different aspects of the reading experience, but what’s the best way to share books with a 1-year-old? The American Academy of Pediatrics has created a literacy toolkit that includes great tips for parents and caregivers who wish to make the most out of reading time!This blog post will summarize a few key points about reading with a 1-year-old throughout three stages: 12 – 14 months, 15 – 17 months and 18 – 24 months. Within each age range, you’ll find examples of what your child can do and what you can do to maximize the reading experience! Continue reading

Preparing your child for a new sibling: A few tips

Welcoming a new baby to the family can be tough on siblings. Rivalry usually begins right after the arrival of the second child, or often times even before it. Most of the time, the older child acts out by becoming aggressive or regressing by acting more like a baby (wanting a bottle, peeing in their pants, etc.). It’s essential to prepare your older child when you know you are expecting a new baby because kids need to know what to expect to feel secure and they need time to adjust to changes.

There are tons of things you can do to make the adjustment process easier for everyone. Here are just a few:

  • Tell your older child about your pregnancy when you tell your friends. It’s important that he/she hears this from you, and not someone else!
  • If any (other) big changes are coming up in your toddler’s life, like moving to a new bed or bedroom, toilet training, or starting preschool, plan to get through them before the baby arrives.
  • Constantly talk to your baby about the baby arriving, giving him or her a realistic idea of what to expect. For example, let him or her know that the baby will take up a lot of your time and that the baby will not be able to do much at first!
  • Sit down with your toddler and look at pictures and videos of his or her birth and baby days. This will give a better picture of what to expect.
  • If it’s possible, visit friends with a new baby.
  • Let your older child participate in the preparations as much as possible. For example, you can let him or her decide the new baby’s first outfit between two choices.

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Reading with your baby: 0-11 months

Reading to your baby is very beneficial. Reading every day helps build a healthy parent-child relationship because it’s an opportunity for one-on-one interaction. Kids who are read to every day have stronger language skills when they reach kindergarten, and are therefore more prepared to learn to read. You can read more about the importance of reading to your baby on our previous blog post. It might seem strange to think that your one month old is actually learning something, or absorbing something out of the reading time. Depending on your baby’s age, you can focus on different aspects of the reading experience, to make sure that he or she gets the most out of it! Continue reading

Coping with tantrums and anger through books

It’s quite common for toddlers to throw tantrums – we can all agree with that! From kicking and screaming to breath holding, they are common from ages 1 to 3 and equally common with girls and boys. What we need to understand is that tantrums are a way for babies to express their feelings and frustration because they are not able to communicate with words yet! The most important thing is that you, the adult, set a good example and remain calm during those stressful moments.Along with tantrums, come other tough behaviors like biting, scratching or hitting. They are all a way for toddlers to get attention or express their strong emotions like anger, fear and frustration. Lacking the language skills needed to deal with them, they resort to those behaviors as a way of saying “Pay attention to me!” or “I don’t like that!” Here are a few things you can do when faced with these situations: Continue reading

Raising a reader!

An increasing number of studies show that promoting reading can have a great impact on children and their future. There are so many benefits to reading for pleasure. Literacy skills, vocabulary, and general knowledge increase, as do self-confidence as a reader and community participation.There are many things parents can do to promote reading and raising a happy reader! It’s pretty simple, really. It all starts with you, the parents! Because research shows that reading books to your little one is the most important thing you can do to prepare your child for reading and learning.

But why limit yourself to simply reading words off a page? Why not take it one – or a few, steps further? Here are a few simple tips and tricks that will certainly help you on your way to raising a reader! Continue reading

Separation Anxiety: Get through it in a fun and insightful way

Just around their first birthday, most kids develop separation anxiety. It’s different for every kid, but in a general manner, it means they get upset when a parent wants to leave them with someone else. This is a completely natural part of early childhood – but it doesn’t make it any less troubling!If their needs are being met, most babies younger than six months have no problem being around other people. But between four and seven months, babies develop a sense of object permanence. Therefore, they begin to understand that things and people exist even when they are out of sight. So that’s when your baby begins to realize that when he or she can’t see you, it means you have decided to go away. Since babies don’t understand the concept of time, they don’t know if or when you’ll return and it makes them rather uneasy.

Understanding what your child is going through and having a strategy to deal with it can help both of you. Here are some tips to help you and your baby get through separation anxiety. Continue reading

Teach self-control through books!

Reading to your child for a few minutes everyday is extremely beneficial for his or her brain development, language skills and social skills! Even the American Academy of Pediatrics has urged pediatricians to constantly remind their patients about this!Books can become useful tools that help your child identify and make sense of feelings, and they help parents teach children how to deal with difficult emotions and situations. Many times books simply offer an easy and productive way to teach children about things like friendship, diversity, and self-control – a fundamental ability.

It is well known that self-control is very important for a child to thrive academically, socially, and emotionally. Self-control is the ability to stop and think before acting – maintaining composure in challenging situations. Therefore, to have self-control you must be aware of your own thoughts and emotions. For parents, teaching self-control becomes a priority, and it is an ability that requires practice to be learned. However, you should keep in mind that babies’ and toddlers’ prefrontal cortex (the part of the brain associated with self-regulation and control) is not fully developed; therefore, it is not reasonable to expect a kid to have self-control like an adult does. If your child is very young, he or she will have trouble effectively controlling emotions, thoughts, and actions – and that’s completely normal! The limits you establish should be according to his or her developmental stage.

Books can be a great way to talk to your little one about self-control! Your child will learn through the different characters and situations in the stories, and talking about it afterwards can help him or her compare and relate them to real life. Have you been introduced to Leslie Patricelli’s books? They are a must – very fun, light, and great for learning about self-control! Look out for these: Continue reading

The go-to tool to teach emotional intelligence

Books can be effective tools to help your child identify different emotions and learn how to cope with complex feelings.

The first years of your child’s life are normally an incredibly happy time for everyone, but that doesn’t mean that your baby does not experience other feelings. Current research suggests that a baby is born with around nine different emotions: interest, enjoyment, surprise, distress, anger, fear, shame, disgust, and dissmell. Over time, those feelings combine with each other and with experiences to form more complex ones. At times, babies and toddlers have trouble expressing their more difficult feelings, they have to cope with anger and fears as they grow. Those feelings can stem from challenging experiences like moving to a new home, losing a loved one or having a new brother or sister join the family. These changes often cause confusion.

As a parent, it’s tough to not be able to understand how your baby is feeling – after all, he or she is not able to put into words what he or she is going through. That causes frustration, imagine not being able to explain or even understand what you are feeling! Books can be useful tools to help your child identify and make sense of those feelings, and they help parents teach children how to deal with difficult feelings and situations. There are a lot of great books out there that were designed to help babies and toddlers begin to distinguish between different emotions. Reading them, and then talking about them together will certainly help!
I would like to recommend two books that I have found very useful – and am personally very fond of:

foto I am happy

 

I Am Happy: A Touch-and-Feel Book of Feelings by Steve Light is a great book for both babies and toddlers. It invites the reader to “touch” and “feel” different emotions by offering a variety of textures to touch. For example, the last page says ‘Every day I feel loved’ and has a picture of a baby tucked in bed under a soft blanket. The softness of the blanket represents the emotion of love. Your little one will love this special hands-on experience every time!

foto when i am : cuando estoy

 

When I Am/ Cuando Estoy by Gladys Rosa-Mendoza is another great addition to your toddler’s collection. The text is in both English and Spanish, so you can read both or choose one. The pages capture what a child could do when he or she experiences different emotions like happy, sad, angry, worried, scared, and surprised. Your child will easily relate to the common situations that are presented on the pages.

 

 

Do you have book recommendations of your own? Please share them by writing a comment below! Keep coming back for more information about the perks of reading to your child and suitable book suggestions!