All posts by Sofía Martínez

Ready, set, go: A journey of my child’s physical skills

Since he is born, you and your child will embark on a journey that will go from him grabbing your finger to climbing on the playground. Your child will astound you with his every day achievements and, as you move through the stops on this journey, you’ll see not only his physical abilities thrive, but also his growing independence and confidence. Keep reading to learn about every stop and landmark you’ll encounter on this trip!

Although independent steps might happen close to your baby’s first birthday, your little one has been on the developmental pathway for the acquisition of walking since he was born. Every effort, body adjustment, and struggle will help him waltz through every one of his developmental milestones and steer him to walk and later on run, climb, and jump.

Here’s a map of his journey and specific recommendations for each stage. As you begin this journey with your baby you need to remember that, even though it might seem intuitive for us adults, running, walking, standing, and even rolling requires a whole set of physical skills. Every effort calls on his motor planning, balance, coordination, and attention abilities.

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Making 2019 the best year yet!

Happy New Year from our Kinedu family to yours! Time flies when you spend time with your little one, right? In the spirit of making this year special for you and your loved ones, we want to share some ideas on how to start this year with the right foot by establishing some family goals. Keep reading to learn more.

New year’s resolutions are great motivators to help ourselves and our children develop better habits and accomplish new goals. This year invite your whole family to join in on the tradition. Here are some ideas for everyone to get started!

For Mom & Dad

  • Better sleep – Set up a bedtime routine creating a soothing space in your room. Relaxing music, aromatherapy, a tea, and making your phone off-limits can go a long way in relaxing your body for a better-quality rest.
  • Less cleaning, more playing! – It’s okay if the house is not all tidy up. Your little one won’t mind if the house is perfectly clean when all he wants to do is have fun with you.
  • Being present – Take a deep breath and focus on whatever it is that you are doing. Groceries are not going to buy themselves by worrying about them; when it’s time to buy them, you can focus on that. Multitasking only separates you from the present moment.
  • Date night – When was the last time mom and dad had some alone time? Having children might change certain rituals, habits, and traditions that you used to have as a couple. Whether it’s dinner for two, an outdoor activity, or taking a trip, find something that brings you closer together and make it a monthly tradition.
  • Love not war – Having a child takes two people, and no one knows and understands your relationship better than you. Try to seek ways to be grateful to your partner each day; “Thank you!” and “Great job!” go a long way. Organize your thoughts before you speak, pause, and listen. Disagreements will rise, so create an environment where support is always present and there’s no problem the two of you can’t handle together. More hugs, less yelling.

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The ABC’s for helping your child develop self-esteem

Children build their self-esteem through experiences. When you play with your little one and allow her to be herself, you are nurturing her confidence. Keep reading to find a step-by-step guide for helping your bundle of joy develop her self-worth.

A is for Appreciation

When your baby is born you are the most fascinating thing in the world for her! That’s why she looks at you in such a miraculous and admiring way. Since she is born, your baby starts appreciating what you give her. She appreciates the warmth of your touch, the light in the hallway because she knows mommy is on her way, etc. Your baby is born into the world feeling appreciative.

So, to make her feel appreciated, you must first pay close attention to her. Turn your expectations into appreciations and acknowledge the reality of who she is. What does she enjoy? How is she like? Allowing your little one to find what truly interests her, rather than what everyone else likes, is part of building her own identity. If your child is playing in the sandbox alone it doesn’t mean she is lonely or has low self-esteem; find out what she is doing that intrigues her so much.

Pay attention to her feelings and try to understand what your little one means —positioning yourself in her little shoes. Observe and ask yourself what she might be feeling when you say or do something. Appreciate her feelings, recognize the legitimacy of what she wants, and let her know you know that. When your little one feels understood she feels accepted and loved.

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A guide to understand my baby’s burping and spitting up

When caring for your newborn, one of the first new parent skills you’ll learn is burping your little one. Every burp your baby makes, serves a purpose. Why do babies burp? Is burping my baby after meals important? Getting your degree on this new skill will take you on a journey filled with joys, dribble, and, of course, extra loads of laundry.

The art of burping

Burping is caused by air swallowing; a burp is the release of the gas up the esophagus and out of the mouth. Burping your baby is a way you can help him get rid of gas and settle his stomach.

Fussiness and gas often go hand-in-hand in babies. When your baby is born, his tummy is the size of a marble. It will grow to be the size of an egg around day 10, and eventually will grow to be the size of a softball. Since your little one’s digestive system is developing, he might experience some discomfort associated with gas and might need your help with that.

Burping your baby

When bottle feeding, give your baby a chance to burp midway through and at the end of the feeding. Keep the nipple full of formula throughout the feeding, this will reduce the air ingestion. When breastfeeding, give him a chance to burp when you switch breasts, and after the feeding.
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Mindfulness 101

As parents, we are always looking for the best for our children; we want them to be happy and develop their full potential. But what happens when we do not live in the best way possible? By being stressed, worried, hurried in our daily life, we ​​set this example to our children. Kids are like sponges, and they can perceive emotions even from within the mother’s womb. This means they’re much more capable of absorbing and perceiving things after they are born. So, how can we be better with ourselves and transmit the best to them? Continue reading to learn more…

Have you ever gotten home and don’t remember what you saw on the road? Left home for work and don’t remember if you locked the door on your way out?

We live with routines both at home and at work where we do things on autopilot without really paying attention to what we are doing. We call it “lunchtime”, but is it if we are thinking about the pending errands we have to run or we are answering mails or texts on the phone?

As human beings we have the ability to think about the past, present, and future. Which is a true blessing, but we often let our minds wander to the meeting board of last week, we think about what we’ll do over the holidays, or what you have to get from the store. Usually the most recurrent thoughts in our minds come from obsessing about the past or worrying about the future. So, what happens to the present?
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The motor skills behind using scissors

The use of scissors requires and enhances many developmental skills. Cutting allows children to build the tiny muscles in their hands since they have to continuously open and close their fingers. Cutting also enhances the use of eye-hand coordination, which means children must be able to move their hands, while looking at something. Since the brain is required to work with two systems, cutting might be a difficult task. But don´t worry, little hands can develop fine motor skills by learning the proper way to use scissors. Keep reading to learn more!

What skills do we need?

Cutting with scissors requires multiple skills, and one of them is the hand separation. This is the ability to use the thumb, index, and middle fingers independently from the pinkie and ring fingers. When your child practices cutting with scissors, he is also using abilities like hand-eye coordination and bilateral coordination because each hand is doing something different.

Although these skills are used during the activity of cutting, they can also be practiced throughout your child’s day. Simple tasks like throwing and catching a ball, using a spoon, or zipping a coat are things where your little one develops his hand coordination, finger dexterity, and builds strength in the little hand muscles.

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Sharing is caring!

Having difficulties for sharing is part of every kid’s developmental process. In fact, the word “mine” is one of the first words to come out of a toddler’s mouth. During your kid’s second and third year, he will experience going from oneness to separateness, so you’ll start noticing comments like “This is mine!”, “I can do it myself”, etc. This is due to his growing self-awareness. So, don’t worry, there are a lot of ways you can help your child understand the concept of sharing. Keep reading to learn more!

Sharing is caring?

Sharing is a fundamental skill; it is how we keep our friendships, play, and work well with others. This action teaches about compromise, fairness, and, most importantly, gratitude. “Thank you for sharing your truck with me. Do you want to play with my teddy bear?”. Sharing teaches children that gratitude reciprocates. If we give to others, we will receive in return. Gratitude is the best policy. Sharing also teaches us about negotiation and coping with disappointment, two vital skills in life.

A little background

After your baby is born, he starts experiencing the foundation of compassion. Hearing another baby cry or feel the stress of the people that surround him causes your little one to become distressed. Even though he can’t say it, he feels what the other baby is feeling. So, your baby perceives and experiments compassion and precursors of empathy since he is very little. Until, at 18 months old, he becomes aware that other people have feelings that are different from his own. Sharing implies empathy and, even though your child won’t experience true empathy until he is 6 years old, he will start developing and showing signs of it very early in life.

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How your baby discovers his hands

When babies are born, they are not capable of associating what they see with what they touch. You’ll notice that your baby seems to be looking in one direction, but moves his hands towards another. This is because babies younger than two months old don’t understand that their hands are part of them. But don’t worry, there are many ways to stimulate your baby’s hand coordination. Keep reading to learn more!

How do babies discover their hands?

Hand coordination in infants is vital for the development of physical and cognitive skills. Since birth, babies start to learn about their bodies through sucking and grasping.

In babies, the discovery of one’s hands is something that can be stimulated through the senses and it works like a domino effect. Practice this with your baby by showing him and making noise with a rattle. First, its sound will get his attention and then he will focus on the object. As he sees the rattle, he will follow its movement and try to reach it with his hands. Once your baby gets the toy, he will begin to notice his own hands. Continue reading

Encouraging my little one’s discovery, art and science interests!

After your baby is born, getting to know anything is a new adventure, and of course the environment in which your child grows up has an effect on her experiences and greatly influences her development. Keep reading to find effective suggestions on how to foster your little genius’s mind!

You’ll notice your little one is adventurous and excited about everything, especially when it’s something new. When we are interested or motivated about something, dopamine is released inside our brain. And when this happens, it is more likely that we remember the activity we are doing because, upon dopamine’s release, the brain feels rewarded. When we reinforce our brain with positive outcomes, the rewards center will help us remember that activity and keep our brains motivated.

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Important facts about pacifiers

As parents, sometimes it’s hard to know if or when to give your baby the pacifier. Overall around the subject there are mixed opinions as to whether the pacifier is beneficial for babies or not. Keep reading to learn more…

All babies are born with a non-nutritive sucking reflex. Even before he is born your baby might be sucking his thumb inside your belly. Once he’s born, your son will learn that sucking means food. Also, sometimes he will also seek his hands or the pacifier to suck and find comfort.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, pacifiers do not cause any medical or psychological problems, so it’s okay to give one to your baby to satisfy his need for sucking. Nevertheless, it’s important not to use the pacifier to delay meals.

For the first six months, pacifiers are beneficial for your little one. However, later on the risks might outweigh the benefits and increase once your kid turns two. Continue reading