As you can observe from your own experience, memory is not only a muscle that needs lots of exercise, it’s also directly correlated to what you already know. For example, learning a new language is easier if you already are fluent in more than one. In the same way, a child’s capacity for encoding new memories and recalling them correctly grows as his background knowledge of the world increases. Following the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines on early development, between 3 and 4 years of age, your son’s cognitive development is on the fast-lane, as he is learning to speak, understand relationship and differences between things, and grasp concepts of time, size, shapes, etc. So, naturally, his memory is also growing rapidly during this time.

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Here are some ideas on how to help your child’s memory skills:

  • Play together. A simple game of “I Spy” can be very beneficial for your kid’s memory, especially if you keep him interested in the task by involving loved characters or toys.
  • Use many senses. When you process information using more than one sense at a time, it’s easier for the brain to make a memory of the situation or event.
  • Make it musical. Music and songs can be amazing memory-boosters. You can help your child put his memory skills to work by singing together and then asking your little one to help fill-in-the-blank of the lyrics.
  • Look at fun photos of family events or outings together. You can help your child identify family members or ask him to tell a story about that day.
  • Don’t forget that sleep is necessary for memory-storing. According to the AAP, toddlers need between 11 to 13 hours of sleep per day, nap-time included.